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German Shepherd Dog – A multitasking expert with dysplasia

 

German Shepherd Dog - A multitasking expert with dysplasia

 

The German Shepherd Dog, so full of temperament, is a faithful companion to people. With their versatile character, these dogs are great achievers in almost any field. However, when you are planning your weekend fun in nature, you should remember about the dog’s proneness to joint disease.

Versatile character

Whether long- or short-haired, German Shepherd Dogs make enthusiastic and willingly cooperating companions. Despite their watchdog character, they love playing with kids and they accept smaller animals.

Whoever decides to take a German Shepherd into their lives should remember that this dog will not be well staying alone. It will spend one night out in a garden or enclosure without protest, but prolonged isolation can adversely affect its development.

Otherwise, a German Shepherd Dog will quickly learn new skills. It is among the few versatile canines capable of succeeding as a household dog, a watch dog, a service dog, reporting dog, avalanche rescue dog, search and rescue dog for rubble searches, or a guide dog.

Disease hardwired in the genes

German Shepherd Dog is a large dog race, which unfortunately has a direct link with orthopedic disorders. Hip dysplasia is the most common degeneration among German Shepherd Dogs; this disorder is congenital and can affect as much as 48% individuals.

Symptoms of the disease can start to show as early as in the second month of the puppy’s life, yet they will be perceivable only after the 6th month of age, when the animal’s growth is most intense. One of these symptoms is a clearly abnormal “wavy” gait, where the rear of the animal’s body would excessively lean to the left and right. In extreme cases, dogs can experience generalized problems with movement.

If the disease is discovered early, non-invasive treatments can be attempted (such as a change of eating habits, regular physical activity). However, if the degeneration is too advanced, surgery becomes the only way for the dog to recover completely.

Although dysplasia is a genetically conditioned disorder, environmental factors play a role as well; therefore, you should make sure your dog has sufficient opportunity to exercise and a good diet. Well-balanced food containing glucosamine, chondroitin, calcium and phosphorus will support healthy growth of bones and joints, consequently reducing the risk of dysplasia.

Recommendations

Your dog would eat also:

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Complete dry food for puppies and young dogs

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Fine chunks with veal and turkey

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Fine chunks with beef, liver and vegetables

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Fine chunks with chicken and pasta

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Steamed fillets with delicious chicken

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Steamed fillets with juicy beef

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Steamed fillets:
2x with delicious chicken +
2x with juicy beef

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